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What’s It Like to Eat Together?

Monte Nido RainRock Primary Therapist Carissa Surace, MFT shares some of her work with families in this week’s blog post. Carissa explains how she went through some trial and error to determine the best way to engage with families during their first session together. Read on to see what question Carissa uses to help begin the conversation…

“What’s it like to eat together?”  

This is my favorite question to ask when it comes to family work at Monte Nido. It can be difficult to know where to start when a set of parents or a partner come to a session for the first time. Usually by the time the first family session comes up the client has been in program for a few days, and a rapport has already been built. Generally we as the therapist already have a lot of information on family dynamics from referral sources, collaboration with outpatient providers, introductory phone calls or emails with primary supports, family assessments, and of course, initial sessions with clients. With all of this upfront information, while necessary to gather, it’s important to also hold space for that loved one’s unique experience. Having a family member or partner with an eating disorder is scary, and it can be hard to know where to start or what questions to ask.

At the very beginning of my journey as a family therapist I would make the mistake of setting up initial family sessions as an open forum for questions and answers between the family members. For the more treatment savvy families this was okay, but for the less experienced families I quickly realized I was leaving too much space and not providing enough structure for the session. After some trial and error of asking very specific questions in an attempt to get the exact right flow of conversation (I’ve since learned that’s not a real thing) I realized that I could always bring it back to the food.

A common expression that we often tell clients and families is that the work “is about the food, and it isn’t about the food.” Since the food behaviors are usually what families notice and become the most nervous about before their loved ones enter treatment, it makes sense to start sessions there. As therapists, we know that there are many underlying issues when it comes to food behaviors, and that the stress and energy is taken out on the food. But this can be difficult for family members to understand or know what to do with. Oftentimes concern for a loved one will manifest in the statement, “I don’t understand why you can’t just eat” which results in frustration for both the client and her supports. Because the food behaviors are what is most obvious in someone with an eating disorder, I have found that it makes sense to start family sessions with questions about the food.

There are a lot of secrets when it comes to eating disorders, especially for loved ones, but what they do know is that eating with their person is challenging and stressful. Clients usually also know this, and have generally been open to talking about it because discussing the energy around the food feels safer than talking about the thoughts and feelings behind the behaviors.  Moreover, it’s not uncommon for clients and families to be hesitant about doing any family work at all. Loved ones might be wanting to keep family secrets in the dark, and clients can often be protective of the family system, or worry that their fragile connections would be destroyed by letting a secret slip in front of a stranger, so talking about the food is a great way into the system to not only build trust, but to get a lot of good information.

I have yet to experience a room full of silence during a family session when I ask what it’s like to eat together. There is really no wrong way to answer, which sets all parties up for success and allows the therapist to pick up on important themes and patterns. For example, if I ask “What is it like to eat together?” the client might say “I get really anxious because I feel like I’m being watched all the time and my parents are policing me.” A parent or partner might respond with “I just want to her eat something and I’m afraid if I leave her alone she won’t eat anything all day.” This is a great way to jumpstart talking about ways in which to give support and go over different levels of responsibility for both the client and her family.

There are many ways to approach family sessions. Of course each family is different and there are an infinite number of ways to approach family issues, but taking it back to the food is a great way to invite everyone to participate while getting valuable information to help structure ongoing family work.

 

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.


Loving Kindness

Libby Parks, MA, LMSW utilizes a compassionate and informed approach to support clients and families on the journey to full recovery in her role as Lead Therapist at Monte Nido Eating Disorder Center of Westchester. In this week’s blog post, Libby discusses the idea of loving kindness in eating disorder recovery.

Call to mind the biggest bully from your childhood. Look at their face, hear their words, and feel their overwhelming presence. Now, imagine that instead of being able to escape when the bell rang, you had to take them home. Every action you took and thought you had would be criticized and ridiculed repeatedly.

Maybe this is where our current insecurities and negative self-talk come from. But maybe our biggest bullies weren’t kids from school and have been slowly forming over time from within ourselves. Either way, many of us engage in this bullying on a daily basis and it can become so familiar that we don’t even question its validity.

Often, when I ask my clients for evidence that their negative self-talk is true, they look at me bewildered. This might be the first time that they have questioned these statements. They may be in disbelief that anyone would think anything different about them apart from what they have been repeating for so many years.

I learned pretty quickly that simply telling a client that they are worthy of being loved, both by others and themselves, would be met with a polite smile and an immediate objection. I saw this deficit of self-love and knew the solution but getting clients on board was the challenge. Just like most of what we do at Monte Nido, my job is to help clients realize the usefulness of this concept, rather than prescribing it to them.

Loving oneself is the foundation for our ability to love others. It allows for intimacy, compassion, and forgiveness. When we can see ourselves in our truest form, as our soul selves, we can realize our unbounded capacity to express and receive love with others. But too often we don’t allow space for that self. We instead focus on the regrettable things we have said or done and have gotten into a habit of bullying ourselves into being “better” people. Allowing compassion for ourselves does not give us carte blanche to act in destructive ways but it does give us the opportunity to see where we have strayed from our values and to bring us back in a gentler way.

Loving kindness, or Metta as it’s known in Pali, is the practice of extending kindness to ourselves and others through the use of simple phrases in meditation. There are four classical phrases but I always encourage clients to find statements that feel most authentic to them. The phrases I recommend are:

“May I be happy.”

“May I be healthy.”

“May I be safe.”

“May I live with ease.”

These phrases are repeated, silently, in the mind to allow us the space to connect compassionately to ourselves. There is no expectation, nothing is forced, and the purpose is to simply allow what comes up. While the execution of this practice sounds simple, it is often quite difficult for those recovering from an eating disorder. The instinct may be to reject the part of themself that continues to struggle with urges or behaviors, believing that continued bullying will motivate them to change their actions. But with loving kindness, our clients can connect with their healthy self to offer a gentle reminder of their worthiness to recover.

 

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.


Articles for the Soul

Join us in reading soulful articles we have cultivated from across the web. If you have found an article you feel is inspirational, explores current research, or is a knowledgeable piece of literature and would like to share with us please send an e-mail here.

 

How Diet Talk Can Harm Your Future Grandchildren Psychology Today

Dear Clients, Thanks for Being Angry With Me Angie Viets

How to Take Your Meditation Outdoors For People Who Don’t Really Want to Sit Still Mind Body Green

5 Eating Disorder Recovery Tips for Autistic People Proud2BMe

An Expert Q&A on All Things Recovery & Exercise Recovery Warriors

Same Me, New Reflection: How I Made Peace with the Mirror Chime Yoga Blog

 

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.

 


Part Three: But I Don’t Want to Accept This Body…A Shoe Story

Monte Nido & Affiliates Director of Nutrition Anna Sweeney, MS, RD, LDN, CEDRD is an expert in the treatment of individuals presenting with eating disorders, disordered eating, and emotional eating. In this week’s blog post, Anna concludes her series in sharing her unique perspective and personal experience on body acceptance. 

Click to read PART ONE and PART TWO of Anna’s series.

On my self acceptance journey, I have learned several things:

1.     Acceptance is not the same as enjoying. Acceptance is a bit like gravity. You don’t have to like it, but no amount of wishing to float is going to make floating possible.

2.     Acceptance might require a period of grief.   If you have been willing your body to be one way for any period of time, transitioning to a new way of thinking about your body might make you sad, might make you angry, and will take time.

3.     Acceptance makes life easier. I spent a number of years vigilantly fighting against my body, speaking negatively of it, and putting myself at risk unnecessarily. It is only because I accept my body that I’m able to live with the ease that I do.

4.     Acceptance is good for you. In the same way that speaking negatively about yourself makes you feel worse, when you are able to speak about yourself from an accepting place – and that can be neutral – you’re better off.  By simply changing the way I spoke about my body, I felt and feel differently in it.

5.     Sometimes acceptance means needing help. This was a hard one for me, as I am superbly independent. But I accept that I need help navigating the world as a woman with different ability. I am choosing to ask for help more and more, and find that this process affirms itself.  For you, this might look like speaking with your therapist or dietitian about body image. And about the challenges of self-acceptance.

6.     Acceptance of what is leaves room for everything else. As I mentioned before, my process of accepting my disability was not always graceful. I fought it with all that I had. And now, I live, breathe, and sleep easier because I’m not fighting against myself.

 

I wish for you the all benefits that body acceptance has to offer. I wish for you the peace that I have found in accepting my present moment body as it is. I wish for you the ability to give yourself permission to approach body acceptance as a part of a larger body journey.

 

And whatever is in your collection of “should’s” SHOULD be examined immediately…What is there? Get curious.  And let me know!

 

My best,

Anna

 

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.


Part Two: But I Don’t Want to Accept This Body…A Shoe Story

Monte Nido & Affiliates Director of Nutrition Anna Sweeney, MS, RD, LDN, CEDRD is an expert in the treatment of individuals presenting with eating disorders, disordered eating, and emotional eating. In this week’s blog post, Anna continues her series in sharing her unique perspective and personal experience on body acceptance. 

To read part one of Anna’s series, click HERE.

A SHOE STORY

Although I was diagnosed with MS when I was in high school, I didn’t have any permanent disability until I was in my late 20s. Starting in high school, I loved shoes.  High heels specifically. I felt like they made me look older, more sophisticated, and elegant. I acquired and wore lovely high heels through high school, college, and part of graduate school. Near the end of graduate school, I stopped being able to wear high heels if I had to travel a long distance. I would ask my partner to park the car close to wherever we were going.  I would wear heels to walk into place where I knew I would sit. I would take off my shoes if I was walking any great distance. As my disease progressed, I wore my high heels in my home only. I would walk in them as though I were practicing to wear them ‘for real,’ but never did.

I completed graduate school in 2009. I stopped being able to wear high heels entirely in 2010. And here is where my declaration of not being crazy should come into question: I didn’t stop buying high heels until the end of 2012. I have strong memories of going into the shoe department, and trying on heels. Of literally trying to make my foot and body coordinate in a way that it could not.  Sometimes I stood up in the heels.  Sometimes, I tried to walk around. Sometimes I just looked at the shoes on my feet. And then I’d buy them. I would take them home, store them with the rest of my high heels, all the while repeating to myself the message that I “should” be able to wear the shoes. That to be a respected professional, or found desirable, or recognized for my work, high heels were a mandate.  WHAT A LOAD OF CRAP.

Even as I was truly unable to comfortably wear these shoes, I was unable to separate my feelings about what it meant to wear high heels from my lived experience.  I was living in the “I’ll get back there someday-land,” and not practicing any acceptance of what was.  I was stubborn, and insistent that I should be able to wear the shoes.

In this part of my mourning-accepting process, I talked a lot of shit. I made nasty remarks about my body. I made fun of myself in a way that felt protective, but wasn’t.   I was so preoccupied by my disability, and my inability to meet my own standards, that I lost more time and energy then I am proud to admit.

And then I was given an enormous gift that in the moment felt awful, but changed the way that I viewed myself.  My fear of being seen as that which is other was confirmed, and out of my frustration, I committed to stop fighting against myself.. It took a while, but I did arrive to the space where I eliminated the shoes that didn’t work for me.  And I ultimately moved past the space where heels held much energy.

This may seem like a small thing, but it was not at all trivial for me, as it was my first overt expression of acceptance of what is. I am a disabled woman, and I can’t wear high heels. Those are two facts about me that actually say very little about who I am.  I imagine that you would find a similar ending if you thought about the parts of yourself that you struggle to accept.  Those parts are not all of you, and they’re probably not the most important parts of you, either.

 

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.


Part One: But I Don’t Want To Accept This Body…A Shoe Story

Monte Nido & Affiliates Director of Nutrition Anna Sweeney, MS, RD, LDN, CEDRD is an expert in the treatment of individuals presenting with eating disorders, disordered eating, and emotional eating. In this week’s blog post, Anna begins her three part series sharing her unique perspective and personal experience on body acceptance. 

I’d like to start this post by stating that in all the ways that matter, I am a sane person. I’ll circle back to this, but want you to feel comfortable knowing that I am sane. (This will come into question later.)

“But I don’t want to accept this body.”

How many times have you said those words? To yourself? About yourself? How many times have you heard someone else use these words about their body?

When I think about body acceptance, and all that it allows for, I am deeply relieved. And I haven’t always been. As I hear often from my clients, body acceptance gets confused with complacency. It gets confused with liking one’s body. And now, because it is a buzz-worthy expression, it has kind of moved to the cool kids table. If you’re not accepting, you’re not in the club.

When I think about body acceptance, I am thrilled to know that it is possible. I am thrilled because I know that it can happen after years of having complicated, tumultuous relationship with one’s body.  I am thrilled to say confidently that body acceptance is one step to healing one of our most important relationships: that with our own bodies.  For humans who feel at home in their own bodies, some degree of body acceptance is possible. This is not to suggest that body acceptance is simple, but for most, it is possible.

From this place of acceptance, we can be gentle. We can be kind. And we can be curious.

Over last 10 years, I have treated many hundreds of clients, at all levels of eating disorder care.  I have heard my clients talk negatively about their bodies. I have observed how damaging body comparison can be.  And I have encouraged my clients to speak kindly of their bodies. ‘Comparison is the Thief of Joy’ is one of my favorite expressions.

In that same time, I have also lived with multiple sclerosis. And over the last five years, I have become a disabled woman. Living the body with changing abilities is rather extraordinary…It’s a little bit like having the rug pulled out from under you when you least expect it. You continue to operate from a place of not expecting the rug to be pulled at all. And you know that it will.

I am not going to make any grand ovations that I have been consistently graceful in the acceptance of my body. That would be a lie. But I have learned a lot about body acceptance, and the good that can come from it.

 

We are exited to share the opening of Monte Nido Eating Disorder Center of Westchester, opening in early 2018.  Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 888.228.1253.

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.

 


A Review: Dancing with a Demon

Monte Nido’s Eating Disorder Center of Philadelphia Primary Therapist Kate Funk shares a special review of the book Dancing with a Demon by Valerie Foster. Read on to see why Kate feels this book is an invaluable resource for families of loved ones struggling with eating disorders. 

Monte Nido’s Eating Disorder Center of Philadelphia had the pleasure of welcoming Valerie Foster to our site for an afternoon of casual lunch and story telling. Valerie introduced herself as, “a mother” and later explained how her career as a high school English teacher paved the way for her to become an author. Valerie was inspired by her daughter’s eating disorder recovery to write the book- Dancing with a Demon. The work tells the tale of a young woman who struggles to fully recover while her family feels held hostage by Anorexia Nervosa. Valerie’s warm demeanor and obvious passion for eating disorder advocacy intrigued me, but I knew I had to read the book when she highlighted it’s focus on the effect the eating disorder had on her family.

There are countless books that catalog the descent into Anorexia, but the focus on the family is something that is often missing. I took the copy she left our staff and devoured it in four days. The book encapsulates what so many of the families I work with experience: blame, misunderstanding, excruciating pain, debilitating fear, and feeling completely desperate for their loved one to get well. The author’s candor and courage to tackle such challenging topics make this a fantastic and hopeful read for those supporting someone with an eating disorder.

Valerie explores the frustration and misunderstanding that is associated with having a family member with an eating disorder. As the illness begins she finds herself mystified trying to decode the behaviors she observes. She searches for clues to protect her daughter but slowly realizes she is unable to outsmart the disorder. The author struggles with feeling responsible for the illness but also faces blame brought on by her community of friends and colleagues. She describes feeling like a failure not only due to her daughter’s illness but with her two sons who she admits were lost in the shuffle as her focus was primarily on Jenna’s health. Valerie finds herself completely devastated and isolated in the fight for her daughter’s life until she finds some relief in asking and receiving help, finding solace in prayer, and practicing self- care.

The importance of caregivers caring for themselves is vital and I appreciate the book’s focus on this element. At Monte Nido, we often see family members that are clearly drained. Unfortunately, it is rare for me to meet caregivers who have their own therapist to support them, let alone those who routinely practice self- care. Valerie discusses her struggle reaching out for help, feeling like she must justify a massage or a short weekend getaway all the while feeling completely exhausted and emotionally overburdened. Some of the most valuable insights in the book come from therapy sessions where the author learns to care for herself while also realizing she can’t force her daughter to recover, though she can be there for Jenna, she can’t walk the journey for her.

Dancing with a Demon by Valerie Foster is an excellent book for any parent whose child is facing an eating disorder. That being said, there are a few disclaimers I’d like to make. The family described in this story is incredibly close, which may be a turn off to some who aren’t as tight knit. Despite their clear bond, it is easy to look beyond their relationship and connect to the author’s pain and feel inspired by her harrowing experience. Another detail worth mentioning is the chapter titles. Each chapter’s title corresponds to her daughter’s rapid weight loss. These titles help the reader feel the sense of frantic urgency a parent must feel watching their daughter’s health decline. Due to this aspect, I would not recommend the book for clients who are currently struggling. These numbers may be triggering and validate the all too common feeling of “not being sick enough”. Despite these particular details, parents and families who are supporting a loved one with an eating disorder would find this book invaluable when navigating guilt, shame, and juggling life stressors while still holding hope for their family member’s full recovery and return to wellness.

 

We are exited to share the opening of Monte Nido Eating Disorder Center of Westchester! Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 888.228.1253.

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.


My Soulful Journey: Carrie Wasterlain

Monte Nido Eating Disorder Center of Manhattan Primary Therapist Carrie Wasterlain, LMSW shares her personal journey as part of Monte Nido & Affiliates in this week’s blog post. Carrie began with Monte Nido as an intern, and now serves as a very talented, dedicated Primary Therapist and a valued team member. Read on to learn more about Carrie and her amazing work…

 

How did your journey at Monte Nido begin?

When I started my social work degree, I already knew my end goal was to work with eating disorders. Going back to graduate school to pursue a completely unfamiliar career path (I was coming from three years of brand consulting) was an exciting but scary step, so I did a lot of research before making the jump. One informative experience included working at the NEDA hotline, and my own recovery from an eating disorder contributed to my decision as well. As soon as NYU allowed me to choose my own internship, I already had my eyes set on Monte Nido, and I pushed hard for a field placement here. I remember being so excited to join the team, even as an intern; the supportive and nurturing environment was like nothing I had ever experienced in a job before, and I felt like I fit in in a way I never had.

How did you prepare to become a primary therapist? How did Monte Nido support you in your professional journey to becoming a primary therapist?

After my internship, I was hoping there would be a job available at Monte Nido that I could transition into. At the time, there were no Primary Therapist spots, but our Program Manager was leaving, and I was asked if I would be interested in taking on her role. Luckily, I had spent the previous months training with her on intake assessments, and I had really enjoyed being the first contact our clients had with Monte Nido. I could imagine, having had an eating disorder myself, how nerve-wracking and scary it might feel to share your story with someone you were just meeting for the first time, and I loved the idea of being able to help prospective clients feel comfortable and supported at this vulnerable time. Monte Nido knew I wanted to grow my clinical skills, and was generous enough to let me shape the Program Coordinator role into a comprehensive mix of clinical and administrative work. In addition to coordinating program logistics and client care, I started leading groups, covering for therapists on vacation, and participating in meals and snacks. I even was able to take on my own clients from time to time, when our census allowed for it. These hands-on experiences ended up being the best training I could get for eventually becoming a therapist. As jumping into a therapist role straight out of school can feel very intimidating, I was happy to be able to transition a bit more gradually into a fully clinical position. I really enjoyed learning about the administrative aspects of running a treatment center as well, and it was fulfilling to get to know each and every client who came to our program during my intakes and orientations.

What was your motivation to become a primary therapist?

My first inspiration for becoming a therapist was working with the social worker who helped me overcome my eating disorder. I had been in therapy throughout my life, but had never fully “clicked” with anyone. I also had only worked with therapists who had a PhD credential, and I was under the impression that that was the only path to becoming a therapist. Once I started working with an LMSW, who was warm, engaged, and truly understanding of my challenges, that perception changed. I realized that a credential wasn’t a good indicator of a therapist’s skill level or ability to connect, and that if I wanted to pursue this career, I could do so without going back to undergrad to prepare for a PhD (I didn’t have any credentials from my undergraduate degree that related to psychology). This is when I started researching social work school.

More specifically, what motivated my interest in working with clients as a therapist was helping people who felt alone in their lives to feel heard and understood by someone.  It’s a simple idea, but one that I believe is tremendously powerful in what can often feel like a terribly lonely world. Many people grow up in environments in which they don’t feel safe to talk openly about their feelings, or haven’t even learned the basic vocabulary for articulating them. I wanted to change that, even if only for a handful of people. I also knew that having had immense challenges with an eating disorder and moving past them would only help me connect to my clients, increasing their confidence that they, too, could overcome this painful disease. After feeling bored after just three years in my former career, therapy appealed to me as it seemed as though I could spend a lifetime learning from the experiences of others. I also liked the idea of it being something that dealt with the genuine experiences of life, rather than a corporate career that felt detached from humanity.

What do you love about Monte Nido?

The people who work here put their heart and soul into what they do. They bring warmth and inclusion to their work, and their interest in helping others always feels authentic. There’s something really inspiring about being around people who have thought carefully about what they want to contribute to the world, and are committing to it with every part of their being, every day. The opportunity to hear the stories of those who seek treatment with us, and to make enduring connections with them, is also really special to me.

Share a story about a soulful/moving/impactful event/situation/client that you have had at Monte Nido.

A couple weeks ago I received a card from a client who was discharging, articulating how much her journey at Monte Nido meant to her and how excited she was to move forward in her life. It was the first card I had ever received from a client, and it was so meaningful to me to hear that something had clicked for her in our time working together. Even as you watch your client gain new insights and become more confident at fighting his/her eating disorder, part of this work means feeling unsure of yourself and your contributions all the time. Receiving the card was a nice reminder that regardless of our doubts in ourselves, we may be doing enough, simply by being their for someone along their journey. Our work is about our clients, so we keep our insecurities to ourselves, of course, but in the end, therapists are human, too.

 

We are exited to share the opening of Monte Nido Eating Disorder Center of Westchester! Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 888.228.1253.

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.


Articles for the Soul

Join us in reading soulful articles we have cultivated from across the web. If you have found an article you feel is inspirational, explores current research, or is a knowledgeable piece of literature and would like to share with us please send an e-mail here.

 

5 Common Myths About Eating Disorders KSL

How You Can Benefit From Adding Music and Art Therapy in Recovery Angie Viets

6 Pathways to Mental Health You Probably Don’t Know Psychology Today

Getting Through a Breakup When You Have an Eating Disorder Proud2BMe

To Treat, To Heal, To Recover from an Eating Disorder Chime Yoga Therapy

 

We are exited to share the opening of Monte Nido Eating Disorder Center of Westchester! Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 888.228.1253.

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.

 


Part Two: Changing the Food Conversation in 2018

Monte Nido & Affiliates Director of Nutrition Anna Sweeney, MS, RD, LDN, CEDRD is an expert in the treatment of individuals presenting with eating disorders, disordered eating, and emotional eating. Anna shares part two of her series about changing the food conversation in 2018…

 

Check out Part One of Anna’s Series HERE

As you start 2018, consider these questions when you’re making decisions about food:

  1. Do I like this food? Enjoyment of food will result in increased nutrient absorption of whatever you’re eating! (Really.)
  2. Do I have the rules about this food? And if I have rules about this food, where did they come from? When did they come to be? And how do they help me? Do they help me now the same way they did I first started following them? If you do have food rules, understanding where they came from, what they were attempting to fix, and evaluating whether or not they still serve you, is a great way to get curious about moving away from them.
  3. Am I eating this food because I like it, or because I think I should? If the answer is anywhere close to the latter, examine immediately! Bring this to your dietitian, and get curious.

Your relationship with food is one of the most important relationships you’ll ever have. Honor that. Eating foods that you enjoy, that taste appealing, and that are being consumed in accordance to your preferences, automatically make those foods good foods.

Wishing you peace and great eating in the New Year!

 

We are exited to share the opening of Monte Nido Eating Disorder Center of Westchester! Learn more about the program by visiting our website or calling an Admissions Specialist at 888.228.1253.

For more information about Monte Nido please call 888.228.1253, visit our website and connect with us on FacebookLinkedInTwitter, and Instagram.